Tag Archives: Vintage Life

Vintage Life: We’re Floored!

The renovation of our 1920s bungalow has truly been a labor of love. You’ve seen the tile floors go down and penny tiles in the bathroom.  We replaced the roof too as well as building a cat porch. Now we’re excited to put down laminate flooring.

Laminate2 We had originally thought that we’d refinish the original hardwood floors, but most of the boards were dry-rotted and had to be completely removed.

We chose a dark walnut laminate rather than true hardwood floors because of the durability against scratches from the dogs’ nails.

We liked this particular laminate because it had staggered sizes of boards and it has a textural wood grain feel. It also has a vintage or distressed look to it, and it has a very thick attached padding to the underside.

Greg worked with our handyman, Frank, to put down the laminate, which we had never done before. They started in the front living room.
Laminate Floor FrontRoomIt really went pretty fast! Greg and Frank were able to lay the laminate in the front living room and dining room in one day.

Laminate floor DiningRoom

In this shot of the dining room, you’re getting an early peep at the kitchen. I’ll show you how the kitchen came together in the next Vintage Life blog. Next came the master bedroom:

Laminate floor MasterBedroom

And then the closet:

Laminate Closet Do you like my vintage Capodimonte light fixture in the closet? I love it!

IkeaClosetNow that the floors were down, we could build the closets that we purchased from Ikea. Ikea does know how to provide a great amount of storage space in a small area. Our master closet is now in the same footprint as the only original bathroom in the house.

Now that we actually had flooring throughout the entire house, we could start bringing in furniture, which made us feel like we were really making progress!

We started with the vintage green leather English sofa and chair set that we had purchased in Asheville.

 

Vintage Leather furniture

Next we brought over our bed…

Headboard

…and our antique dining room table and chairs.
antique dining table and chairsStay tuned! The kitchen is the last piece that is truly needed before we can move in and that will be the next Vintage Life blog post!

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 9 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

October Home Decor & Antiques Roundup

We hope you enjoy this quick “antiques roundup” of highlights from our October blog posts, linked to the original stories so you can go back to see them for yourself!

We had quite a busy month, including adopting a new cat and ooh-ing and aah-ing over the photos in our spotlight on our customer’s gorgeous Greco-Roman mansion home.

Greco-Roman mansion in Newberry, SCThis is the outside of that lovely house and the inside is just as amazing, filled with antique furniture chosen by our customer Tamra. She chose some beautiful pieces from us, including a French Country Louis XV refectory table, antique Hunting chairs and Hunting buffets, and a couple of antique Mechelen buffets. You really have to see this mini tour, so take a look at the full blog post about Antique French Furniture in a Classic Newberry Mansion.

Cat that Hurricane Joachmin blew inOur happiest news this month was the arrival of our new little tiger cat Pumpkin. She turned up on our doorstep looking wet and bedraggled after Hurricane Joachim dumped 18″ of rain in Newberry over one weekend.

When I opened the door, she pranced in as if she belonged here and pretty soon she did! She arrived just in time to be the star of my National Cat Day post.

You can see how she’s been making herself at home all over the gallery, and we’ve also shared recent cute photos of some of our other fur babies.

Welcome Pumpkin… named for the month you arrived!

Replace Wooden Roof on our Vintage BungalowWe were less happy a while ago when we found that the roof was leaking in the sun room of our 1920s vintage bungalow. During all our renovations, we hoped that we had about 5 years left in the existing roof but it turned out to be only 3 years. There was nothing for it but to Raise the Roof! As you can see in the post, we also added some skylights and chose a patriotic shingle and paint combo, so it all worked out just fine!

Safe House USA Marble Print duvet coverThe final highlight that I’d like to mention of our home decor blog posts this month is about the Marble Decor Trend. Marble in furnishings and architecture is, of course, a classic favorite, but now it’s getting a new boost of appreciation from the interior design world.

Aside from furniture featuring marble details, the current trend has inspired faux marble looks on everything from textiles to wallpaper! This marble print duvet cover is a great example of a fresh take on an eternally elegant material.

I look forward to spending November with you, sharing more ideas and stories about antique furniture and home decor. Stay cozy!

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 9 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

Vintage Life: Raise the Roof!

Removing the old shinglesIn the continuing story of As the Bungalow Renovation Turns – a.k.a. the renovation of our 1920s vintage bungalow – now that we had the walls up and painted and had laid most of the ceramic tile floors, unfortunately we found that the roof had started to leak in the sun room.

When we purchased the house, we thought we had about 5 years left in the existing roof, but it turns out it was only about 3 years.  And so we needed to replace the roof.

Although Greg is extremely handy, and I am a delightful assistant, we decided not to attempt a roofing job ourselves as Greg does not like heights. We hired a crew and they set to work removing all of the old roofing shingles. as you can see in the photo above.
Tarpaper Vintage BungalowThere were quite a few areas where the wood underneath the shingles needed to be replaced too.
Replace Wooden Roof on our Vintage BungalowSince we had a crew up on the roof, we decided to go ahead and punch three large skylights in the roof for more light in the upstairs converted attic space. We’re glad we did – it turned out great! Here you can see the skylights being opened up…
Skylights added to vintage bungalowHere are the finished skylights. They are perfect to bring in the light and give us a glimpse of sky.
Skylights on vintage bungalow

After just two days, the new roof was completed and looked good.This is the view from the back of the house:

New Roof on 1920s Vintage Bungalow

We choose a reddish-colored roof shingle that matched the reddish-paint on the brick foundation around the bottom of the house. It’s a very patriotic combination with the blue paint and white trim! Patriotic Vintage BungalowWe are delighted that it looks so great. We could have done without an extra roofing job but it all turned out for the best! We were so lucky that our little vintage bungalow stayed nice and dry when Hurricane Joachim blew through.

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 9 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

Vintage Life: Building a Cat Porch

BowlOGreensWe didn’t intend to have eight fuzzy babies, it just worked out that way. We know we have a cat overpopulation situation, so as we worked on the renovation of our 1920s vintage bungalow, we made sure we created a special space for the cats too. This is how we ended up building a “cat paradise” screened porch for everyone to enjoy.

Here are four of the cats. I keep them supplied with a pot of cat grass so they can happily graze all day!

 

Before we built the cat porch

This shows our porch after we hung new exterior siding, but before we screened it in.
We thought it would really make the porch look nice to tile it…

Tiling the cat porch

…and of course we needed a great vintage screened door, which we found at the Antique Tobacco Barn in Asheville, NC, where we also have a booth.

vintage door for cat porch

Then we added a very interesting oyster chandelier. We have oyster chandeliers for sale in case you like it as much as we do and are interested in buying one!

OysterChandelier in cat porch

There are two cat doors on either side of our front door leading out to the screened front porch so that everyone can come and go as they please – which they do all day and night. We constantly hear “flap, flap, flap” from the cats going in and out.

cats on the cat porchWe built steps up to corner platforms on each side of the porch and then more steps up to walkways along the top of the porch and over the screened door, so that there are plenty of spots for all six cats to enjoy the porch at the same time. We also built a fireman’s pole out of sisal rope so that they could climb up and down it like a tree and use it for a scratch post.

Sunset on the cat patioMinkey and Fozzy take their perches to enjoy the view at sunset.
Fozzy cat on the cat porchFozzy knows we can’t reach him up there.

Evening on the Cat PorchLenny, Fozzy and Minkey checking out the neighborhood after the sun has set. Everyone really enjoys “cat paradise” on the patio – even Greg and I like to kick back on the porch with a couple beers after a long day.

Have you “spoiled” your fuzzy babies with something built especially for them them? Tell us about it in the comments or show us with a photo on our Facebook page.

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

Vintage Life: April Showers bring May Flowers!

Greg and I love to putter in the garden – we find it so relaxing to be outside, digging in the dirt. I like to call it yard yoga. As soon as spring starts, we can’t resist working on the landscaping for our vintage 1920s bungalow, even though we still have so much to do inside! When the weather turns so hot we can’t stand to be outside, we’ll turn back to our inside projects. We’ve come a long way over the past few years.

Here are some photos from when we first cleaned up the front yard…

FrontYardCleanedUp

…then created beds, planted baby plants, and put down grass seed in the Spring of 2012.

Yard Spring2012

The following spring in May 2013, the roses were in bloom, the grass was starting to fill in…
Spring 2013 Front Yard…and the jasmine and climbing roses were taking over the trellis. spring 2013 rose trellis

Last spring, we worked in the back yard. We hadn’t done much since 2012 when we cleared it, put up a fence, and planted baby trees:

BackyardAfterCleanup2012

In the Spring of 2014, we tore down the old dilapidated shed
and built a pretty, new shed for garden tools:

building a new shed

This is the finished shed – it matches our vintage 1920s bungalow!
Shed to match vintage bungalowWe also built two raised garden boxes and planted peach trees and fig trees: Planted garden boxes

We’ve been busy this year planting more flowers in the front yard…
Spring2015 planting the front yard…and in the side yard:
SideYard planted Spring2015We added four planters on the steps – two of which belonged to Greg’s great grandmother – family heirlooms for blooms! We also added hanging baskets, bird feeders and a couple bird baths, and I built a rose bed around the mailbox out of vintage bricks.
MailboxRoseGardenSpring2015In the backyard, we built two more raised garden boxes.
Raised boxes EarlyGarden2015We have strawberries in one bed; corn, beans, peas, and cucumbers in another; watermelon, cantalope, and zucchini in a third, and tomatoes, eggplant, and peppers in the fourth.

Raised bed garden 2015

I think we’re going to have a bumper crop of tomatoes this year!
Raised garden vegetables
Do you love to garden? Tell us about it in the comments!

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

Vintage Life: We Love Penny Tiles!

Greg and I knew from the start of our 1920s bungalow renovation that we wanted to place penny tiles in the bathrooms to keep the vintage look of our home.

Penny Tiles in Half BathroomWe started with the smallest room first: the half bath located off the living room/dining room. We chose all white tiles with a dark grey grout to emphasize the shape of the tiles.

The beadboard trim was created with original beadboard from the ceilings and it is painted a bright white while the walls are a rosy lavender – I love it! I just can’t get a good photo because the room is so small, but I’ve added a beautiful Italian vintage Capodimonte chandelier complete with pink drop roses.

Next came the upstairs guest bathroom and small side closest, where we also chose all white penny tiles.

Penny tile vintage look

I’m concentrating hard, here! This was our first experience with penny tiles and we have to say that they are a little more difficult to lay than large tiles. Penny tiles come on square sheets, but the sheets stretch, which makes it a bit difficult to get the spacing exactly even.

FInished upstairs bathroom penny tiles

Our floors aren’t perfect, but I think they show vintage charm! This is the finished upstairs bathroom. We carried the beadboard trim motif upstairs too but we had to use new beadboard sheets as we had run out of the original old beadboard. The trim is painted a bright white while the walls are a pretty green tea. It isn’t installed yet, but this is where my restored pink claw foot tub will go! What do you think?

restored pink bath tubFor the master bath, we chose marble penny tiles featuring varying shades of grey and white with hints of blue and yellow. We set it off with a dark grey grout.

MasterBath with penny tiles

We used the last of the original beadboard, painted bright white, in the alcove where my restored yellow claw foot tub will go.

yellow bath tub for vintage bungalow

We also added a bling-y vintage Rococo chandelier with sparkling crystals. Ta-da!

Master Bath with crystal vintage Rococo chandelier

Although it is not installed yet as we haven’t finished tiling the large walk-in shower and the adjoining wall, we have converted an antique Louis XV sideboard into a double vanity by removing the top and replacing it with Alabama white marble with grey veining to complement the tile floor.

Converted vanity antique French Louis 15

We’re considering placing a pair of the new Ambella Home Star Mirrors over the vanity. Here’s a photo of the mirror – let me know your thoughts in the comments below!

Ambella Home Mirror Star

If you just can’t get enough tales from the tile side, our last Vintage Life: Time To Tile! blog post talked about our adventures with the pretty Mexican tile in the kitchen, sun room and utility room. Grout on!

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

Vintage Life: Time to Tile!

Greg's FancyTileSawIn the continuing story of our 1920s vintage bungalow renovation project, now that the walls were up and painted, we needed floors! Greg and I have completed several tiling projects together so we knew we could tackle this project too. Besides, Greg really likes to use his fancy tile saw.

We started with the largest area first – the kitchen, sun room and utility room – which would all have a pretty Mexican tile that complements the warm Creamsicle color on the walls.

Kitchen and Sunroom before the tilesThis is the kitchen and sun room before the tiles are down. AimeeTileFirst we lay out all of the tiles and I mark where the cuts need to be made,
while Greg cuts the tiles.

Greg applying mastic for tilesGreg then puts down the mastic in sections….

Greg laying tiles…and spreads it evenly.
Yep, we’ve got to be extra careful to keep all our cats and dogs out of the room at this point!

Tiles with spacersFinally, I lay the re-lay tiles on the mastic, press down firmly and get them aligned with spacers. It isn’t difficult work but it does take time to get it right. We spend so much of our time in front of the computer on a daily basis that it is actually fun to work on a project with your hands that requires your total concentration.

Grouting the floor tileIt took three full days to put down all the tiles in the kitchen, sunroom, and utility room, which we did over a long holiday weekend. The next step is to fill all the spaces between the tiles with grout, which makes a great big mess. I actually think cleaning up the grout at the end is the worst part of tiling!

FinishedSunroom

But it’s all worth it in the end. Above is the finished sunroom floor.
And below is the “before” photo of the utility room…

Utility room before floor tileAnd now here’s the “after”…

Utility room with tiling floor finished

Quite a difference, huh? After the tile was finished in the kitchen, sunroom and utility room, we hung two vintage chandeliers

Vintage chandeliers and new tile

One has a brass finish and the other is a Flemish chandelier with a copper finish – to give an interesting mixed metals effect. I recently wrote a blog post about the trend for mixed metals in home decor so it seem we are all the rage!

Next up is tiling in the master bathroom, guest baths and the front porch. I’ll tell you about that next month. If you love vintage penny tiles then stay tuned…

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

Vintage Life: Paint the Walls!

It is amazing how a coat of paint can change a space. Or in our case, quite a few coats of paint can really start to make our three-year long 1920s vintage bungalow renovation project look like a home! But before you can appreciate the painted surfaces, I want to show you a
creative touch Greg thought up.
Vintage bungalow beadboardTrimAfter the drywall went up, we decided to add a bit more character to the walls in the front living room as well as the master bathroom. We created wainscoting from beaded board that was original to the house. You might remember that some of the ceilings had water damage and those areas had to be replaced with new beaded board. We cut out the bad spots from the original beaded board, planed it down to remove the paint, and then dovetailed it in place with the shoe molding and the chair rail trim.
Vintage Beaded Board CeilingHere is a shot of the original beaded board ceiling after it was sanded down, caulked between every board, and then painted a fresh coat of bright white! It was very labor intensive, but we think the result is fabulous! We have 10-foot beaded board ceilings throughout the whole house and most of it is original.

Vintage Bungalow Front Living Room
You’ll notice we’ve chosen 1950s pastel colors throughout the house to keep with our vintage motif. The front living room is a pretty mint green that has a nice calming effect and it really sets off the beaded board wainscoting after it was sanded, caulked between each board and painted bright white. My living room is pretty close to Guilford Green, one of the paint colors of the year that I blogged about last week, but it is definitely more minty than silvery.

Vintage 1920 bungalow FrontRoom2

Vintage bungalow fireplace

We also painted the original fireplace that had been painted dark maroon with orange walls and changed out the ugly front door with vintage Craftsman style door.

Vintage bungalow kitchen

For the kitchen and sun room at the back of the house, we chose a cheery, warm yellowish-peach color that seems to change throughout the day as the light changes.

vintage bungalow master bedroom

The master bedroom is a soft greyish-blue that feels very relaxed. We found a great 1920s vintage kitchen cabinet at the Antique Tobacco Barn in Asheville and built it into the bedroom wall. We’ll use it as a bookcase and as a place to display framed family photos and personal mementos. Here it is:

1920 Vintage Painted Bookcase

I have still have to replace the glass in the cabinet doors with seeded glass and paint the doors – it is on my very long to-do list!

I’ll show you the paint colors in other rooms as we add vintage light fixtures throughout the whole house and start on the flooring. Till then, thanks for reading about our vintage bungalow adventures. What do you think of our decor so far?

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

Vintage Life: Bungalow Renovation HVAC, Insulation & Drywall

As we are about to move into our 1920s vintage bungalow, I’ve been updating blog readers about the renovations we’ve done since we first saw the house for sale in historic Newberry, SC, in 2011. It was in desperate need of love, as you can see from my two recent posts about the first stages of the vintage bungalow renovation and the second stages of the vintage bungalow renovation.

This is how it looked in summer 2012, soon after we’d done all the landscaping and also added beautiful new siding.

vintage bungalow summer2012

Looks pretty, doesn’t it? But the inside was a whole other picture! Then we took about a year off from working on our little bungalow. Life got busy and home renovation funds ran low. Also, Greg’s carpal and cubital tunnel syndrome in both hands reached the point where he couldn’t hold tools without his hands going numb, which obviously put a damper on progress. Three surgeries and a re-financing later, by January 2014 we could get back on track with the bungalow!HVAC

The first order of business was HVAC. We had ripped out all of the old ductwork, so we ran new ductwork throughout the house and up to the new upstairs space that used to be the attic.AC-Unit for vintage renovation

Luckily the existing AC unit looked to be in good condition, so it just needed to be serviced.

insulation

When we originally pulled down the walls, we were surprised to find that the house did not have any insulation whatsoever. We debated doing foam insulation, but in the end we found a great deal on Craig’s List for enough roll insulation to do the whole house.

radiant barrier in vintage bungalow renovatoin

We did add a foil radiant barrier and foam board behind the insulation for a little extra warmth.

insulationupreadyfor-drywal

Here’s the insulation up, and ready for the drywall. Soon it WILL look wonderful!

Install drywall 2Greg is amazingly accurate with materials calculation. He figured we needed 202 eight-foot sheets of drywall, but all of the contractors who came to quote the drywall job thought it was way too much.

installing drywall7

We hired a company to hang and mud the drywall for us in order to speed up the renovation. With the walls going up, we finally felt we were making progress toward finishing this project. In the end, Greg totally nailed it with his calculations.  It took exactly 202 sheets of drywall to put walls up in the entire house!

upstairswithwalls2

This is the upstairs with the walls in place. Next up is painting inside and out and a new roof!

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

Vintage Life: Our Renovation Continues Part 2

A few weeks ago I wrote a post to remind readers of our antiques and home decor blog about the story behind our own 1920s bungalow renovation. It’s been such a LONG story since we first spotted the vintage bungalow for sale in historic Newberry, South Carolina back in 2011. The house was in awful condition… but we saw the potential!

Planning the bedroom ensuiteIn Our Renovation Continues Part 1 I took you up to the first major demolition work we did. Here’s what happened next…

We pulled down walls and changed the flow of the house. We planned a master bedroom with an en suite, and started work on the upstairs attic space, but found a very gross mess that had to be cleaned up. Apparently the former owner had allowed a dog to use the attic as a yard – seriously?

And then we were really on a roll. I admit that I tend to be a little compulsive – actually it is a personality trait that Greg and I share.

Vintage Bungalow RenovationSometimes when I start cleaning, I end up, hours later, having scrubbed the whole house, because since I’ve cleaned this, I might as well clean that… and on it goes. Well, that’s what happened in our little 1920s bungalow. We hadn’t originally meant to replace all the windows, but with the new subfloors in place, suddenly the old ones seemed so ugly. The new sliding glass doors in our sun room bring in so much more light!

Replumbed houseOf course, we always intended to replace all of the wiring in the house. But since we were on a roll, we also buried the ugly electric lines connecting to the roof of the house and had a new telephone pole connection installed to access the City’s power line. We also re-plumbed the whole house, and accessed the City’s water main. We dug a trench through the front yard to connect to the City water line at the street level, and ran all new PVC/CPVC pipes from the street to under the house!

We hadn’t originally planned to replace all of the exterior siding, but once we pulled down the interior walls and could actually see daylight through the old lap siding (because there was not a single piece of insulation), we knew that would have to be done too.

DamagedBungalowSidingWe also found some termites munching away on the house and had to replace a part of the front sill. Now do you see why this project has taken three years?! But the new exterior siding (below) looks so much better, and we added OSB under the siding for more stability too.

New siding on vintage Bungalow

Oh, and we’ve been doing landscaping for three years now. The little yard is starting to take shape, but still has a long way to go. First we clear-cut the jungle, removed all the poison ivy, and hauled out about 9,000 pounds of yard debris. That is not an exaggeration – truly about 4.5 tons!

antique brick pathWe painted around the brick base of the house, and created large flower beds in the front yard, where we planted baby roses, camellias, azaleas, gardenias, hydrangeas, crepe myrtles, and boxwoods, and a large variety of bulbs (most of which did not come in). We shoveled 18 cubic yards of mulch and started grass from seed. We planted baby trees around the perimeter of the privacy fence we put up, and we even built a brick sidewalk with old, antique bricks. We have plans to build a new driveway with antique bricks too, but we haven’t gotten there yet.

FrontPorchInBloomThe last Vintage Life blog post was from the end of the summer of 2012, with the landscaping in full bloom. Everything was coming up roses, but we still had a long way to go. We finally plan to move in to our 1920s bungalow before Thanksgiving this year, whether it’s finished or not. So, what has happened in the past two years? Stick with me, I’ll show you how much further we’ve come!

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.