Tag Archives: ceramics

Ways to Display Your Ceramics Collection

My last post was about decorative ways to display a collection. That included vintage teapots, cameras, and model trains, amongst other collectibles. The Welsh Dresser style hutch that I showed in that post is a classic way to display china and ceramics  – our antique buffets are great for this too! But today I’m sharing some other ways to display your ceramics collection.

Blue and white ceramics Delft

Blue and white ceramics, especially antique Delftware, always look fantastic grouped together. This photo from my earlier post about Blue and White Delftware proves it!  Remember that if you have three or more of any one type of item – or even three or more different objects in the same color – you immediately have a collection. Group them together for maximum impact.

This photo is also a good reminder to USE your ceramics collection whenever possible. Take your blue and white ginger jars and vases down off the shelf and flaunt them in a stunning table setting like this. Just add a few simple white flowers and wait for the admiring comments!

Usually you see blue and white vases and ginger jars displayed on a shelf or table, all on the same level. What I love about this photo is that the jars are clustered both on the console table and below it, creating more dimension in a double layer of visual interest.   The tasteful blue and white looks crisp and elegant against the mellow wood table and flooring.

Create a gallery display of your collection of plates to add a beautiful dash of color to a room.  This example blends traditional blue and white plates in all shapes and sizes with some punches of lively red. It’s the perfect combination for the rustic beachy feel of this space, or for a breezy maritime look in an ocean cottage. Before hammering any nails in the wall to hang plates in a gallery display, it’s best to get your layout arranged. Place the plates on a large table or on the floor for a test run!

Looking for a completely different way to display your collection of plates? The creative couple in this 1980s ranch style home used an antique picture frame to show off their plates. The picture frame is about four feet wide and the flourishing silhouette makes a focal point of the plates.  I think this display would look fabulous with our vintage teacup and spoon chandeliers!

To finish up this mini-series about displaying your collections, I’ll be back soon with a post about storing and displaying jewelry in creative ways to enhance your home decor.

If you’ve got any examples of great ways to display your ceramics, jewelry, or collections of anything else, send them my way! Tell us in the comments or on our EuroLux Home Facebook page!

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

Customer Appreciation Sale 15% Off Everything

Get 15% off all new, vintage, and antique furniture and home accents in our Customer Appreciation Sale! I recently mentioned that EuroLux Home won a Best of Houzz 2015 Award. The award was for our Customer Service so we are sharing the love with all our customers for Valentine’s Day. Our special discount is valid now through February 16, 2015.

Order something you love for your home at EuroLuxHome.com and you’ll get 15% off everything (as well as our always-free shipping) when you enter the coupon code at checkout: HappyFebruary

That seductive deal is enough to make anyone swoon! Here are some ideas for your Valentine’s gift for your home.

antique French rococo bed

This Louis XV Rococo antique bed arrived recently from France, and it is rich in romance! Dating to 1900, the full-size French antique bed is intricately carved in walnut wood with a sensuous shell cartouche on the headboard. Floral carvings complete the pretty picture.

French Antique Chairs Renaissance Hunting Red Red is the color of romance and the gorgeous red upholstery on these French antique dining chairs is sure to look alluring in your dining room! The set of six antique Renaissance Hunting style dining chairs dates to 1880 and the oak chairs are hand-carved with grapes, foliage and barley twists. The antique chairs recently arrived from France so they bought the language of love with them.

Normandy Antique Armoire

What a sweetheart! Fans of French Country furniture will sigh with passion when they see this delightful oak antique French armoire in the Normandy style, dating to 1890. A carved vase of flourishing flowers catches the eye at once, but look closer on the mirrored doors and you’ll also be charmed by the sweet birds pecking at grapes or berries. We have an equally pretty Normandy antique bed to match.

Black Forest Stag Sconce lighting Combining the romantic appeal of the Old World with high-quality Made in the USA crafting, this fabulous stag sconce is part of a new line we just started to carry. The new sconces and chandeliers are based on antique Black Forest designs and cast in resin with terrific details. They look like carved wood and have a nice weight to them. They’d pair beautifully with your Hunting Style décor!

Chelsea House Covent Garden Painted Urn Finally, this stunning new Chelsea House hand-painted vase or urn is bound to bring spring into your home. You can almost smell the fragrance of the riot of flowers hand-painted across the 18-inch-high porcelain vase.

The Covent Garden urn is named after the historic Covent Garden flower market in London. Covent Garden is where Professor Henry Higgins first spotted Eliza Doolittle selling her flowers in the play Pygmalion and the Audrey Hepburn movie My Fair Lady. That truly was a romantic story worthy of Valentine’s Day!

However you choose to use your 15% discount, we hope you love the piece you buy.

For more inspiration browse our complete EuroLuxHome.com inventory. Then take 15% off everything in your shopping basket when you enter the coupon code: HappyFebruary

The offer is valid through February 16, 2015. Happy Valentine’s Day and happy shopping!

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

Client Spotlight: Vintage Deruta Ceramics

Our customer, Bunny J., in nearby Chapin, SC, sent us a photo of her kitchen decked out in Italian vintage Deruta ceramics from EuroLuxAntiques.com.  Bunny has been a great customer for many years. In the past she’s purchased an armoire, a set of 8 chairs, and lots of vintage majolica and pewter pieces.

Vintage Deruta ceramics in our client's kitchen

I love how Bunny has created a nice sense of balance with her display of ceramics. That large yellow and blue plate is a cheerful focal point in the attractive tile nook. Old hand-painted majolica always adds a welcoming note in a kitchen. While Capodimonte is probably Italy’s most famous porcelain manufacturer, collectors in the know also look out for vintage Deruta majolica.

Vintage Deruta pot

This vintage Deruta pot is a nice example, and it’s one of the antique and vintage ceramics and majolica pieces in our gallery right now. Majolica means a hand-painted earthenware pottery with a tin glaze and it is named for the Spanish island of Majorca. The style spread to Italy, including to the medieval town of Deruta in Umbria. The local clay around Deruta was so good for ceramics that craftsmen were firing up their kilns by the early Middle Ages. They really hit their artistic stride in the 15th and early 16th centuries.

The vintage Deruta pharmacy pot dates to the 1950s, hand-painted with a Renaissance design.  It was found in a European antiques market. We think it would be lovely in a kitchen as a canister for flour, sugar, salt, or spices.

Italian Deruta ceramic fountainI can’t resist showing you this incredible Italian fountain that we have in the gallery too. Deruta ceramics are still being made and although the hand-made fountain is not vintage Deruta it is a beautiful example of the style.

The Deruta fountain shows the Moorish influence of majolica’s Spanish heritage and the doves and flowers are also typical of Italian majolica. The doves are taking a drink from the running water that pours from the spout into the sink below

When I first saw the fountain, I was delighted by how very Italian it is in spirit. How can we see the lemons and grapes on the fountain and not think about living La Dolce Vita?

The fountain looks like a pedestal sink, but really this colorful new hand-painted fountain is meant for a garden, patio, porch or sunroom. It’s more than 6 feet tall – that’s a lot of Italian style! .

The use of blue, orange and yellow are also typical of Deruta majolica. Those sunny Mediterranean colors always bring a smile to my face and they perk up any space.

Thanks to Bunny for inspiring us with the vintage Deruta ceramics in her kitchen! If you have any old (or even new) Deruta majolica, I’d love to hear what you like about it. Tell us in the comments box below.

Aimee owns EuroLuxAntiques.com with her best friend, Greg.  Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way.  She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Connect with or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

Ceramic Restoration Tips: How to Fix a Broken Ceramic

Oops… crash! Do you have any broken ceramic items lying around the house waiting to be repaired? We’ve got some tips so you don’t have to put the job off any longer! Greg’s mom Kathy is our Director of Restoration Services and she is a certified expert in fine ceramics restoration. Kathy made this video with tips on how to fix your broken ceramics.

The item Kathy repairs in the video is a broken ceramic figurine, a.k.a. Prudence. The large figurine was shipped from Europe to a friend of ours and it arrived with a broken arm. Our friend asked Kathy to take a look at Prudence and see if she could do a repair on the poor girl’s arm. Of course, if EuroLuxAntiques.com packed and shipped this figurine (or any other antique ceramics in our gallery) it would not arrive broken!

Prepare to Fix your Broken Ceramic

1. Kathy says that before starting with the glue, make sure you have paper towels handy as you will definitely need them.

2. Then she starts by looking at the broken surface to see what kind of glue is needed to repair it. She rubs the broken edge with a toothbrush and sees that some powder comes off it. She also sees a few little air holes. This tells Kathy that it’s a soft paste with a lower firing temperature than some other ceramics.

3. With that information she chooses a white glue. The scientific name is polyvinyl acetate (PVA). Elmer’s white glue is the brand Kathy’s prefers. It goes on white and becomes clear as it dries. Note that white glue is water-soluble. It is unlikely that anyone will ever need to put Prudence in water… she’s already suffered enough! But if you do fix a broken ceramic with white glue, you must remember not to soak it later otherwise it will come apart.

4. If there is already glue on the raw edge from a previous fix, you need to clean that off or the new repair won’t seat perfectly.

5. Kathy uses a cardboard box to put the item in and support it while she works. This trick means that gravity does the work for you. The broken ceramic remains stable as it is lodged against the sides of the box. Prudence is a large figurine so Kathy got a banana box from a grocery store. If you have a smaller item to mend, then you would choose a smaller box.

Now the stage is set… let’s get on with the show!

How to Repair the Broken Ceramic

Kathy places the figurine so it balances and is lodged perfectly in the box. Before placing the arm, she is careful not to scrape the broken edge of the piece around too much. She doesn’t want to loosen particles that will interfere with the seating of the piece.

How to glue broken ceramicNext, Kathy applies glue all around the edge of the piece. Some people say to put the glue on both edges of the break – the broken piece itself and the main body you’re attaching it to. Kathy doesn’t usually do that unless it’s quite a wide break. But she does recommend applying the glue all around the edges of the break and then putting some glue down just inside the rim of the break. Then when she places the arm back on the figurine, the glue will run down on the inside. It covers the break on the inside too and gives a little extra strength to the repair.

Once the arm is seated, Kathy wipes off any excess glue spilling on the outside. Then she presses the broken pieces together as hard as she can for about one minute.

“That helps it to heal,” she says. (You can tell that Kathy was a nurse in the U.S. Navy. She worked in that profession for 35 years!) Because white glue is water-soluble, she can go back later once the glue has dried and easily clean off any other excess glue.

So now you know how to fix your broken ceramic items. Let us know how it goes or ask any other questions in the comment box below. Kathy also gave some great tips on deciding when to leave antiques repairs to a professional and when to tackle it yourself in our blog post: When It Breaks: DIY or Professional Restorer?

Aimee owns EuroLuxAntiques.com with her husband, Greg.  Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way.  She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Connect with or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox!

When It Breaks: DIY or Professional Restorer?

We’ve all felt that horrible sensation in the pit of our stomach when a treasured piece of china crashes onto the floor. Did it break? How badly is it broken? Can we salvage it at all?

Whether the damaged item is a cherished antique Blue Delft vase or an antique Belgian dining chair, it can be difficult to decide how to proceed. Some repair or restoration projects are do-it-yourself in nature, while others perhaps should be left to a professional.

As you might imagine, we do quite a bit of repair and restoration work around here. Not every item that arrives in a shipping container from Europe survives the trip unscathed. Thankfully, we have Greg’s mother, Kathy, to perform expert repairs and restoration on items that need tending. By the way, if you ever have a question as to whether we’ve repaired or restored an item in our inventory, please don’t hesitate to ask. Usually, we tell you right in the description, but I’m never offended by questions!

Because ’tis the season when glass and china items get dropped, knocked off the shelf, or otherwise broken, I asked Kathy for some tips on how to decide when to use a professional restorer. We focused on ceramic items because Kathy is a certified expert in fine ceramics restoration, as you can tell from this photo!

Step One: Consider the Monetary Value of the Object

The value of an object after restoration should be the same as it was before the object was broken. If the cost of repairs will be significantly more than the item is worth, you might want to try repairing it yourself. Obviously, you wouldn’t want to professionally restore a $2 coffee mug. And sometimes you can go on Replacements.com to find china pieces for a fraction of the cost of a professional restoration.

Step Two: Consider the Sentimental Value

You may feel an heirloom item is worth professional restoration, regardless of the cost. That’s OK. If you have a piece you want to continue to pass down through the generations, and if you can afford the cost to have it restored, then why not do it?

Step Three: Consider How the Item is Used

Most professionally restored ceramics cannot be soaked or washed in a dishwasher. This means a repaired object must be relegated to decorative status. If you’ve broken a utilitarian piece, such as a dinner plate, you may want to check other sources for a replacement rather than trying to repair the piece. If, on the other hand, the broken object is a vase, you may wish to proceed with the repair even though you know you won’t be able to display fresh-cut flowers in it anymore.

Step Four: Consider the Expense

A truly skilled restorer can make a broken piece look new again, but this expertise comes at a price. You should also take into account these factors that can increase the cost of any professional ceramics restoration:

  • If the object is broken into many pieces
  • If pieces are missing and must be fabricated
  • If the pattern has to be researched (for example, to determine the correct shape for a handle to be fabricated)
  • If a repair (such as gluing) has already been attempted and the old bonding must be removed
  • If the object includes decorative pieces in raised relief, such as flowers, that must be cast in a mold

It’s also worth noting that Royal Doulton and Dux items usually cost more to repair because cracks tend to “travel” during the restoration process, making the whole thing trickier and more time-consuming.

How to Choose a Professional Restorer

If you decide to have that heirloom vase restored, here are a few things to look for in a professional restorer:

  • Professional certification from a noteworthy training institute or school
  • A portfolio of repairs for you to review to evaluate the quality of work
  • Customer testimonials available on their website or referrals to clients willing to discuss their experience with you

If you have any questions about professional ceramics restoration, we’re always happy to chat with you by phone!

 Aimee owns EuroLuxAntiques.com with her best friend, Greg.  Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way.  She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina.  Connect with or sign up to receive this blog in your inbox!

Our blog posts to your inbox like magic! Just enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner. We respect your email privacy.

All About Bequet…

Hubert Bequet began creating beautiful ceramics in 1926 at the Belgian ceramics manufacturer Auguste Mouzin et Cie (AMC).  (This manufacturer was later renamed La Faencerie de Wasmuël, which operated from 1878 to 1951 in the southwest coal-mining region Borinage region of Belgium.)  AMC was known for fine quality ceramic pieces and specifically for their 1910 introduction of mass production ceramic mantle clocks.

 Bequet opened his own ceramics production factory in 1934 in Quaregnon, incorporating everything he had learned at AMC. The apex of success for the factory was in 1963 when it employed 150 workers, but eventually closed its doors when the pottery and its director then began to experience various problems. The large factory closed in December 1982. Hubert Bequet did however continue to produce pottery in a small workshop, “The Ceramics of Borinage”, until April 1985 before closing for good.

Known not just for his colorful, high-quality ceramic pieces with gold rims and elaborate decoration, Bequet also brought mass production to the forefront of the ceramics industry.  Early pieces were either unsigned or imprinted with Belgique and a model number. Pieces  made later on were marked with “Made In Belgium: H. Bequet Quaregnon.”

Below is a slideshow of sample Bequet work.

Bequet ceramic piece

 Aimee owns EuroLuxAntiques.com with her best friend, Greg.  Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way.  She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina.  Connect with or sign up to receive this blog in your inbox!

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner