Tag Archives: 1920 Bungalow Restoration

Vintage Life: My Dream Vintage Kitchen

In my previous Kitchen Krazy blog post, I explained our design inspirations and some of our furniture ideas for the kitchen in our 1920s vintage bungalow. Let’s see how it worked out!

Vintage Cabinets Greg sanded down the kitchen cabinet door frames that we had repurposed from the spare doors on an antique cabinet we bought to use as a bedroom bookcase.

(You can see the finished bookcase here.)  I cut new glass panels using seeded glass that looks like old glass.

We knew those would be the upper cabinet doors on either side of the sink. From there, John Hopfensperger of Cayce Custom Cabinetry designed the kitchen cabinets.

vintage style cabinets

John’s designs included all of our wish list items such as a rack for plates, shelves next to the window for growing herbs, a lazy Susan corner cabinet for pots and pans, a slide-out garbage can, and a spot for the microwave off the counter. The vintage light fixtures were hung first.

vintage style cabinets

In addition to kitchen cabinets, I also wanted to use an antique buffet in the kitchen to add even more character to the space. We found an 1920s Arts & Crafts antique buffet in France several years ago and knew it was the perfect piece! It was even painted on the inside with the same blue-green color that I wanted for the cabinets and it has wonderful antique glass doors. Although the top would normally sit on the bottom cabinet, we wanted to hang the top on the wall in order to create more counter space.

Antique French buffet

I held my breath while Greg and the cabinet installers hung it!

antique french buffet

The hardware on this cabinet also inspired the choice of hardware for the rest of the kitchen.
antique buffet hardwareKitchenHardware

I haven’t completely moved everything in yet nor finished decorating my wonderful kitchen, but here are some early “after” photos.

Love my vintage kitchen

Of course, I am also not planning to have plywood counter tops. I want copper counters, but that is still a project we haven’t finished yet. We also have work to do for a backsplash. Don’t worry – you’ll see finished photos eventually!

Love my vintage kitchen
Although the house is far from finished, with the installation of the kitchen, we were finally ready to move in – after three years of hard work!

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

 

 

Vintage Life: Kitchen Krazy!

Before we started the renovation of our 1920s vintage bungalow, Greg and I talked about which things were most important to each of us. Greg (the music lover) wanted the whole house to be wired for media so that he could listen to his favorite tunes in surround sound, no matter which room he was in.

As for me, I wanted a gorgeous and unique kitchen – unlike anything you would see in most homes. Although I know it is very trendy, I really didn’t see myself in a kitchen with dark wood cabinets and granite countertops and stainless steel appliances. I wanted colorful, painted cabinets that looked vintage and had a great deal of character.

Deruta DishesStock kitchen cabinets were out of the question so we hired a local craftsman, John Hopfensperger of Cayce Custom Cabinetry.  I fell in love with his ability to create custom paint finishes with as much distressing as I’d like. I wanted the aqua green-blue color that you see on vintage 1957 Chevrolets because it matched my hand-painted Italian Deruta dishes that we bought in San Gimignano when we lived in Europe.  I know the vibrant colors are not for everyone, but I love it!

Finished bookcase with doors

The style of the kitchen cabinets were influenced by  this antique kitchen cabinet that we found at the Antique Tobacco Barn in Asheville. We actually bought that cabinet to be a built-in bookcase in our bedroom so I can use it to display my favorite books and family photos. (It’s not full yet in this photo… I’m still working on it!) The three upper areas have glass doors and the three lower areas have solid wood doors.

Glass doors from vintage cabinetThere were four extra glass doors that came with this bookcase, and we decided those would make great kitchen cabinet doors.

vintage Kitchen SinkYou might remember that I blogged about an awesome vintage double sink (it still has the original Sears catalogue sticker from 1952 inside) that we found at a ReStore when we were antiques shopping in Asheville. We had it completely restored and here it is mostly installed.

That’s the background story, I’ll show you in my next post how it all turned out!

AimeeAvatarAimee owns EuroLuxHome.com with her husband and best friend, Greg. Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way. She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina. Find us on Facebook or connect with EuroLux on Google+. Or you can sign up here to receive this blog in your inbox.

Vintage Life: Our 1920s Bungalow Renovation

Greg and I love old things. It seems to us things were just made better in the past, and had a great deal more style. Nowadays everything is made from plastic and meant to be thrown away – the hallmark of our “disposable” society.

And while there is nothing wrong with the functional Chevy Lumina, I don’t think folks 50 years from now will want to collect and restore one – it just doesn’t have the pizzaz of say, a 1965 Ford Mustang. To be honest though, we might be a little biased. Greg’s first car that he bought back in high school (and we still have) was a 1965 Mustang convertible, but that is a story for another blog post.

From the 1880s through the 1930s, our little town of Newberry, South Carolina, was in her heyday due to prosperity from several cotton mills.  An Opera House was built and business was booming down on Main Street.

A great number of arts and crafts style bungalow homes were built in the area around Main Street. Harper Street has long been our favorite street in Newberry because of the charming houses and huge oak tree canopies – so we always walk our dogs there.

Last October, we noticed a For Sale By Owner sign had gone up in the front yard of one of the worst lots on the entire street. We had often mentioned in passing that it was a shame the owner didn’t clean up that place, as it really was a cute house. Even though we were not in the market to buy a house, we decided to call the owner to take a look inside.

It was even worse on the inside than we suspected.  This poor house had been sorely neglected for years.  The City had even summoned the former owners to court with mandates to clean up the property.  A neighbor told us that the Fire Department had to rescue a colony of cats that had been living there with an even earlier prior owner.

But as any owner of an old house will tell you, we just knew we were supposed to rescue that house.  Our hearts fluttered as we imagined how great it would look after we renovated.  With a leap of faith, we owned this disaster a few weeks later.

I’ll give you a tour of the property.  Walk up the driveway on the right side of the house, past the dilapidated handicap ramp.

Now you’re looking into the backyard that is completely overgrown (with poison ivy and poison oak as I’ll soon find out), has a rickety old metal shed, and lots of garbage and huge chunks of rotted tree, filled with termites, of course.

There is an addition on the back of the house that was started by the prior owner.  It is a complete mess.  And the left side of the house is completely covered in ivy.

We have our work cut out for us.  I’ll leave the inside to your imagination right now.  You’ll have to read the next blog post to see just how bad it was.

 Aimee owns EuroLuxAntiques.com with her best friend, Greg.  Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way.  She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina.  Connect with or sign up to receive this blog in your inbox!

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