Monthly Archives: January 2012

The Story of Blue Willow

If you have been antiquing for very long, it is a great possibility you have seen the Willow pattern in your shopping travels. Thomas Minton designed the pattern around 1790 and for more than 200 years, various manufacturers have used this beautiful, storied transferware pattern.

Born in 1765, Thomas Minton was an English potter. He founded Thomas Minton and Sons in Staffordshire, England which grew into a major international ceramic manufacturing company. Willow, commonly called Blue Willow, is an elaborate, picturesque pattern used on pottery, ceramic, and porcelain kitchenware, and is actually based on a story:

Long ago, a Chinese mandarin emperor, Tso Ling, lived under the branches of an apple tree on the right of a bridge in a majestic pagoda. Over this pagoda and bridge drooped the immortalized willow tree, in front of which is seen the graceful form of a fence. Tso Ling had a beautiful daughter, Kwang-se, who was the promised bride of an old, wealthy businessman.

The girl, however, fell in love with Chang, her father’s clerk, and the two eloped. The mandarin chased them in order to have them killed when suddenly, the gods transformed them into a pair of turtledoves that were able to fly away. These turtledoves are seen gazing into each other’s eyes at the top of each piece of Blue Willow pattern pottery.

Below are more samples for beautiful Blue Willow pieces:

 Aimee owns EuroLuxAntiques.com with her best friend, Greg.  Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way.  She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina.  Connect with or sign up to receive this blog in your inbox!

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Client Spotlight: Hilton Head Island, SC

Alan W. enjoys getting away from it all at his vacation home on Hilton Head Island in South Carolina. We certainly agree that the view from his dining room overlooking the bay is extremely relaxing – can you hear the gentle waves lapping the shore and the cry of the sea gulls?

Alan was seeking antique dining chairs to go with a large dining table, and we helped him find a Set of 6 Antique French Renaissance Chairs in walnut dating to 1900 that had unique leather seats with embossed dragons on the backs.

Alan also needed additional storage for china and serving pieces in the dining room, so we suggested a massive Vintage French Renaissance Sideboard in oak dating to 1950 with ornate carvings, large twisted legs, and wrought iron decorative supports.

If you’re searching for handsome antique dining chairs, or perhaps an attractive Antique or Vintage Sideboard, let EuroLux Antiques help you find the perfect addition to your home.

Thanks for stopping by the EuroLux Antiques blog!

Aimee

 Aimee owns EuroLuxAntiques.com with her best friend, Greg.  Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way.  She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina.  Connect with or sign up to receive this blog in your inbox!

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All About Bequet…

Hubert Bequet began creating beautiful ceramics in 1926 at the Belgian ceramics manufacturer Auguste Mouzin et Cie (AMC).  (This manufacturer was later renamed La Faencerie de Wasmuël, which operated from 1878 to 1951 in the southwest coal-mining region Borinage region of Belgium.)  AMC was known for fine quality ceramic pieces and specifically for their 1910 introduction of mass production ceramic mantle clocks.

 Bequet opened his own ceramics production factory in 1934 in Quaregnon, incorporating everything he had learned at AMC. The apex of success for the factory was in 1963 when it employed 150 workers, but eventually closed its doors when the pottery and its director then began to experience various problems. The large factory closed in December 1982. Hubert Bequet did however continue to produce pottery in a small workshop, “The Ceramics of Borinage”, until April 1985 before closing for good.

Known not just for his colorful, high-quality ceramic pieces with gold rims and elaborate decoration, Bequet also brought mass production to the forefront of the ceramics industry.  Early pieces were either unsigned or imprinted with Belgique and a model number. Pieces  made later on were marked with “Made In Belgium: H. Bequet Quaregnon.”

Below is a slideshow of sample Bequet work.

Bequet ceramic piece

 Aimee owns EuroLuxAntiques.com with her best friend, Greg.  Aimee sources amazing antique furniture, vintage lighting, & high-quality reproduction furniture to help her customers decorate their homes in a unique way.  She loves her 8 (you read that right) fuzzy children and is renovating a 1920s bungalow in South Carolina.  Connect with or sign up to receive this blog in your inbox!

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